Big 10

Former Saginaw, U-M star LaMarr Woodley finds focus after NFL career

July 17, 2017

Hugh Bernreuter | hbernreu@mlive.com

Woodley pursues interests after ‘unofficial’ retirement

LaMarr Woodley attends Saginaw Promise fundraiser to raise money for college scholarships

Saginaw native and NFL Super Bowl champion LaMarr Woodley holds up his own jersey at the Saginaw Promise scholarship program fundraiser at the Horizon’s Conference Center on Wednesday, July 20, 2016. Woodley was the keynote speaker of the night. (Heather Khalifa | MLive.com File)

His final game in the NFL, at least unofficially, came in Arizona in a 34-31 win over the Cincinnati Bengals in a game that, for LaMarr Woodley, included a bunch of zeroes.

Zero tackles, zero sacks, zero interceptions, zero passes defended.

But there was one big one. One torn pectoral muscle.

Woodley, the former Saginaw High, University of Michigan and NFL standout, played his final NFL game on Nov. 22, 2015, ending the season and his career on injured reserve.

“I’m not officially retired … there aren’t any papers,” Woodley said. “But I’m done.”

Woodley’s ‘Camp 56’ provides opportunties for college scholarships

LaMarr Woodley football camp

LaMarr Woodley takes pictures with camp participants at his LaMarr Woodley Camp 56 football camp at the Legacy Center in Brighton, MI on Thursday, July 13, 2017. Woodley, a University of Michigan graduate and NFL Super Bowl champion, hosted the camp for about 60 high school students from around Michigan. (Matt Weigand | The Ann Arbor News)

His football career is done. But life goes on for former NFL players, especially those that are just 32 years old.

“I’ve been preparing for this … I knew the NFL wasn’t going to last … it can’t last,” Woodley said after Camp 56, a two-day camp for high school football players who have the potential to earn football scholarships but are facing challenges in attracting college scouts.

Camp 56, at The Legacy Center in Brighton, features Division 2 and NAIA football coaches as instructors, giving both players and coaches a chance to work together

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